Volume 28, Issue S1 LB402
Nutrition
Free Access

Tolerance and Cognitive Function Effects of a Proprietary Spearmint Extract in Men and Women with Self-Reported Memory Impairment - A Pilot Study (LB402)

Kristin Nieman

Kristin Nieman

Metabolic Sciences Biofortis Clinical Research, Addison, IL, United States

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Kelli Herrlinger

Kelli Herrlinger

Human Nutrition and Health Kemin Foods, L.C., DES MOINES, IA, United States

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Kristen Sanoshy

Kristen Sanoshy

Metabolic Sciences Biofortis Clinical Research, Addison, IL, United States

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Arianne Schild

Arianne Schild

Metabolic Sciences Biofortis Clinical Research, Addison, IL, United States

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Kathleen Kelley

Kathleen Kelley

Metabolic Sciences Biofortis Clinical Research, Addison, IL, United States

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Kevin Maki

Kevin Maki

Metabolic Sciences Biofortis Clinical Research, Addison, IL, United States

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Michael Ceddia

Michael Ceddia

Human Nutrition and Health Kemin Foods, L.C., DES MOINES, IA, United States

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First published: 01 April 2014
Citations: 2

Abstract

This pilot trial assessed the tolerance of a proprietary extract from Mentha spicata L. and its effects on cognition in subjects with self-reported memory impairment. Subjects (N = 11) consumed 900 mg of the extract daily for 30 d. Participants were 73% female and 27% male with a mean age and body mass index of 58.7 y and 27.4 kg/m2. Tolerance was assessed by evaluation of gastrointestinal (GI) tolerability, adverse events, and clinical laboratory tests at baseline and the end of treatment (EOT). Acute cognitive effects were evaluated by comparing pre-dose vs. 0.5 to 4 h post-dose values at baseline and EOT. Subjective cognition was also assessed at the EOT. Consumption of the extract for 30 d did not significantly alter GI symptoms and subjective cognition improved (3.5 vs. 4.0; P = 0.063). No serious adverse events or clinically relevant findings in the safety parameters were observed. Cognitive function task scores suggest improved reasoning (24.7 vs. 33.4 points; P = 0.023), attention/concentration (18.0 vs. 40.5 points; P = 0.002), and planning (29.8 vs. 44.1 points; P = 0.088) from baseline after 30 d of treatment. Day one, subjects experienced acutely improved attention/concentration from pre- supplementation vs. 2 h (63.4 vs. 82.4 points, P = 0.042 and 18.0 vs. 34.8 points, P = 0.025) and 4 h (63.4 vs. 92.5 points, P = 0.001 and 18.0 vs. 39.8 points, P = 0.002). These results suggest the extract was well-tolerated and may improve certain aspects of cognitive function. Further investigation in a randomized, controlled trial is underway.

Grant Funding Source: Kemin Foods, L.C.